Archive for the ‘Education & Teaching’ Category

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Starting a Flight School

Looking for Capital to Start Your Business?

Are you wondering how to obtain small business financing so that you can turn your dream business into a reality? Would you like to know the best ways to obtain small business loans? Or maybe you want to know more about angel investors or venture capitalists. We highly encourage you to read our review of three solid resources that can help you with your new business financing in our article, Small Business Financing: How to Obtain the Capital You Need to Start Your Business.

Starting a Flight School Business Overview:

Starting a flight school is a great idea for an entrepreneur with flight instructor certification or anyone looking to capitalize on their fascination with flying. To soar high among the birds and the clouds is a dream many people have and flight schools make that dream a reality by offering private flying lessons. If you are already a certified flight instructor (certified by the FAA), opening a flight school is a fun way to share your training with flight students. If you are not a pilot or are not certified to teach, you can always hire certified instructors to work for you. Keep in mind that instructors are only allowed to teach to the level at which they are certified. For example, an instructor has to be IFR (instrument flight rules) certified to teach at night or in foggy conditions. A pilot without certification in a two-engine plane can only teach in single-engine planes. If this sounds like a fun business idea but you’re still unsure how to start a flight school, travel to nearby cities and talk with the owners of flight schools there. Just be sure that your business will not be in direct competition with theirs. Once you have a good idea of your business model, you need to purchase at least one plane, preferably two or three. Look for well-maintained used aircraft since they can be just as safe as new aircraft at a fraction of the price. Start out with a single-engine Cessna or Piper as those are two of the best “starter” aircraft for instruction purposes. Next you’ll need to find a location for your business. An office at the airport is ideal but if you live in a rural area you may be able to use an abandoned field runway if it’s FAA approved. You don’t need to rent hangar space; your aircraft can be tied down outside. Insurance is important in this business as you will need it for your planes, your instructors and your clients. You should have all students sign a waiver prior to going up but you still need to be covered in case of an accident. You’ll also need to have a maintenance contract with a shop certified to work on aircraft. Look for one that’s near your planes so you don’t have to worry about transport. You’ll find that this business is easily scalable; you can start with one instructor and one airplane and add to your staff and your fleet as your client list grows.

A Day in the Life of a Flight School Business Owner:

If you are the instructor, you will meet appointments at your office or at the airport, depending on the level of your students (substantial on-the-ground study and test preparation is necessary at certain points in the training process). You will spend your day instructing your students either in the air or on the ground. If you have a staff of instructors working for you, you will stay in the office, field calls, schedule planes/instructors and market your business.

About Your Customers:

Your customers will be individuals interested in obtaining a pilot’s license.

What You Need to Start:

  • Flight school business plan
  • Airplane(s)
  • Office
  • Access to airstrip (airport or rural field runway)
  • Certified flight instructor(s)
  • Insurance
  • Computer with finance software

The Good:

  • This is an excellent business opportunity for a certified flight instructor.
  • It’s rewarding to help others realize their dream to be able to fly.
  • If you’re not a certified flight instructor, you can hire one or more to work for you.
  • A flight school is a fun atmosphere.
  • You get to be around airplanes and other pilots all day and do what you love.

The Bad:

  • Start-up investment is high and aircraft maintenance is costly.
  • You’ll need several regular students/customers to make money with this business.

Resources:

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How to Start a Cooking School: Large Scale or Small

Looking for Capital to Start Your Business?

Are you wondering how to obtain small business financing so that you can turn your dream business into a reality? Would you like to know the best ways to obtain small business loans? Or maybe you want to know more about angel investors or venture capitalists. We highly encourage you to read our review of three solid resources that can help you with your new business financing in our article, Small Business Financing: How to Obtain the Capital You Need to Start Your Business.

How to Start a Cooking School Business Overview:

Attention foodies: if you love to cook and enjoy teaching others your craft, you should learn how to start a cooking school. Learning to cook is very popular today as seen by the boom in television programs that teach the inexperienced home cook how to cook like a restaurant chef. You don’t have to have skills of a restaurant chef to run a successful cooking school, however. You only need to have a passion for food and a love for passing that passion on to others. Being able to cook a lovely meal for a friend or loved one is an empowering and rewarding skill to have. Individuals take cooking classes to learn proper techniques and gain knowledge they can take back to their own kitchens so they can cook for themselves and others. Couples enjoy taking cooking lessons so they can share a hobby and have more fun in the kitchen. When starting a cooking school, you should consider what type of school you will operate. There are so many choices, it’s important to have a business plan to help you focus your efforts. You could choose to run your cooking school out of your home and just offer classes to a few people at a time. People will pay extra for these “private” lessons and they will enjoy the personalized attention. You could hold your cooking classes at a local established business like a specialty grocer, gourmet shop or wine store. If you enjoy teaching a large group, you could lease out the commercial kitchen of a catering company or college during their slow time of year. You should research cooking classes that are already offered in your area then figure out a specialty that is not currently available. You could offer classes in a certain ethnic fare, baking or grilling. Before you open for business you need to be sure to have the proper certification for the safe handling of food and beverages. Neglecting to get this certification can result in huge fines. Next you’ll need to market your business around town. Advertise with flyers posted at grocery stores, specialty food shops, wine stores, in parks, etc. You may find that this is one of the most popular business ideas available and with great skills and a fun teaching environment, you might soon have to find a larger space and hire a staff to help handle all your students.

A Day in the Life of a Cooking School Business Owner:

You will begin your day by checking your schedule and appointments. If you hold classes at your home, you will go to the store, buy items you’ll need for class and return home to prepare your kitchen for your students. If you hold classes away from home, after your trip to the store, you’ll set up in the wine shop, culinary school kitchen or where ever your classes are being held that day. You will greet your customers, collect payments and proceed with the class. At the end of the class you and your students will enjoy a meal to taste all the recipes you made during the cooking session. At the conclusion of the session you will distribute business cards and encourage your students to spread the word about your business and to come back themselves for another lesson.

About Your Customers:

Your customers will be individuals looking to gain cooking skills they can take home to their kitchens.

What You Need to Start:

  • Cooking school business plan
  • Marketing plan and materials
  • Cooking skills
  • Kitchen (home or elsewhere)
  • Cooking materials (pots, pans, utensils, etc.)
  • Ingredients
  • Food handling certification
  • Business license
  • Insurance
  • Staff (optional)
  • Computer with finance software

The Good:

  • Cooking classes are fun and exciting.
  • Start-up costs are relatively low.
  • You can choose to offer classes for as many people as you choose (and have room for).
  • You are likely to get repeat customers and referrals.
  • It is rewarding to pass along your passion to someone else.

The Bad:

  • There are likely plenty of cooking schools in your area so you’ll need to offer something unique to set your business apart.
  • If you are not properly certified to handle food and beverages, you could be fined.

Resources:

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Tutoring by Teens: A Unique Business Opportunity

Looking for Capital to Start Your Business?

Are you wondering how to obtain small business financing so that you can turn your dream business into a reality? Would you like to know the best ways to obtain small business loans? Or maybe you want to know more about angel investors or venture capitalists. We highly encourage you to read our review of three solid resources that can help you with your new business financing in our article, Small Business Financing: How to Obtain the Capital You Need to Start Your Business.

Tutoring by Teens Business Overview:

If you’re an excellent student who’s looking for a way to put your smarts to use in your very own small business, you should start a tutoring by teens business. Many parents today are vigilant about their children’s grades and hiring a teenage tutor would be a wonderful option. Your teen tutor business would cater to younger children in elementary school and middle school, helping them raise their grades in basic studies like math, history and English. Depending on your high school curriculum, you may even be able to earn course credit for tutoring children. But even if you don’t earn credit, owning and operating a tutoring business will look wonderful on your college applications and your resume. You would likely set up your tutoring appointments in the afternoons so as not to interfere with your clients’ dinner and bedtime schedule. You may have some weekend appointments as well. This business idea requires in-person communication so you’ll meet your clients either at their homes or at their schools (if their schools offer after-school programs). Therefore, you will need some form of transportation. If you’re not old enough to drive, you can always ride your bike to your appointments. As you market your business around town and your schedule fills up, you will probably need to hire teen tutors to work for you. At that point, you can either continue tutoring your clients or hand them off to one of your capable tutors and concentrate on marketing and managing your business.

A Day in the Life of a Teen Tutoring Business Owner:

Your day will begin with a check of your schedule to see what appointments you have after your school day ends. You will travel to meet your clients either at their homes or schools and tutor them in various subjects. You will also meet with parents from time to time to discuss their children’s progress. If your schedule allows, you will spend some time marketing your business around town with fliers and business cards. You will also talk to counselors at local elementary and middle schools, asking them to refer students to you. If you have a team of teen tutors working for you, you will need to coordinate assignments with them and check with them after their appointments to check the students’ progress.

About Your Customers:

Your customers will be elementary and middle school students who need help with various school subjects. You will also be working with students’ parents to discuss students’ progress and arrange payment.

What You Need to Start:

  • Marketing materials
  • A pricing plan
  • A computer
  • Transportation
  • A knack for teaching young children

The Good:

  • It is rewarding to help children learn.
  • Owning a business looks great on college applications.
  • You can easily run this business in the evenings and on weekends.
  • This is a great way to stay in the loop on new curriculum in the elementary and middle schools.
  • Start-up costs are minimal and you can charge top dollar for high quality tutoring services.

The Bad:

  • Some students and parents will be difficult to work with.
  • You must manage your time effectively to leave room for your own school work and extracurricular activities.

Resources:

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What You Need to Know to Start a Tutoring Business

Looking for Capital to Start Your Business?

Are you wondering how to obtain small business financing so that you can turn your dream business into a reality? Would you like to know the best ways to obtain small business loans? Or maybe you want to know more about angel investors or venture capitalists. We highly encourage you to read our review of three solid resources that can help you with your new business financing in our article, Small Business Financing: How to Obtain the Capital You Need to Start Your Business.

Starting A Tutoring Business Business Overview:

Starting a tutoring business can enable you to earn over $50 per hour, work from your own home, set your own hours, and teach the students you want to teach. Sound good? These are just a few of the perks of tutoring as a successful business idea. You also get to make a name for yourself as an expert in your subject area and eventually hire tutors to work for you—in your subject or in others. One of the best advantages of this enterprise is that it’s quite easy and inexpensive to start a tutoring business. For starters you will need to be an expert in your subject area, whether you’re a teacher or a writer or a mathematician. Next you will want to have a “program” or methodology for teaching your subject matter. You might teach SAT- or standardized test preparation-style questions or you might use a textbook or workbook to create a curriculum. Of course you will want to tailor your program to each student’s specific needs. Then you will have to decide where you’ll work—a local library, the student’s home, or your own home. No matter the location, you will want to set aside a quiet zone where everyone knows you are not to be disturbed. Finally, you must determine whether you want to charge an hourly fee or a session fee. There are benefits to both—you will need to decide which works best for you and your teaching style. When you have ironed out these important details, you’re ready to recruit your clients. You can start by word-of-mouth or you can head right to the internet and get your business up on a tutoring site like Tutor Post. You can also post flyers in your library and even in your school district’s guidance office if that is allowed. With a bit of effort and sharing word of your new business with your friends and acquaintances, you can have a solid tutoring business up and running in no time.

A day in the life of a tutoring business owner:

When you’re a tutor, your days will be very specifically set up to suit your life schedule. Whether it’s a couple of sessions per week or per day, you will be able to work when you want (and of course when students are available). On a work day, you will review your schedule to see which clients you or your employees will be tutoring and what material was last covered. You will then want to review the material that will be covered in the day’s sessions and prepare any resources that will be needed. Then you will want to ensure you or your employees get to the tutoring sessions (if you travel to them) in a timely fashion and are prepared to start teaching when the client gets there. When the session is through, you and your tutors will want to document the material covered in the session, the homework given to the client, and any important information the client or their parents should know about their progress. Finally, because you are running a business, you will want to keep close track of your income and expenses to determine how many clients you need to maintain for profit.

About Your Customers:

Your customers will be students of many ages who require extra help in your subject area. They will likely be struggling students who may (or may not) look forward to your sessions.

What You Need to Start:

  • Expertise in the subject area in which you plan on tutoring
  • A program or curriculum to follow
  • A fee schedule
  • A location for your business
  • A tutoring page on a website
  • Advertising for your business
  • Financial-tracking software

The Good:

  • You can set your own hours.
  • The subject matter is likely something you already enjoy and are good at.
  • You can work from home.
  • The business can be very lucrative.
  • You can hire tutors to work for you.
  • As long as there are students, there will be tutoring work.

The Bad:

  • You may occasionally have to deal with a reluctant student. In those cases, motivating the student may be as much a part of the work as the actual teaching you will be doing.
  • You may run into the occasional difficult parent who has unreasonable expectations.

Resources:

Start This Business Today:

To start a tutoring business today, we recommend you purchase Tutor & Grow Rich. Learning the ropes from an entrepreneur who has started a successful tutoring business is a great way to learn more about how to do it yourself. This invaluable resource is full of great tips and information that only a successful tutoring business owner might know. For more information or to purchase this HIGHLY RECOMMENDED book, click here.

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